The Great Society comic book
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The Great Society comic book by D. J. Arneson

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Published by Parallax Comic Books in New York, NY .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Johnson, Lyndon B. -- 1908-1973 -- Comic books, strips, etc,
  • Presidents -- United States -- Comic books, strips, etc,
  • Political satire, American -- Comic books, strips, etc,
  • United States -- Politics and government -- 1963-1969 -- Comic books, strips, etc

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby D.J. Arneson and Tony Tallarico.
GenreComic books, strips, etc.
ContributionsTallarico, Tony, 1933-
The Physical Object
Pagination[32] p. :
Number of Pages32
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL23077776M
OCLC/WorldCa71279222

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The Great Society Comic Book. Parallax Publishing Company, Inc., Series. Published in English (United States) # [] Cover Gallery. . History. The Great Society was a team of super-humans who came together to fight off the alien invaders that had occupied their planet. They were formed four years after the previous superhero team of their world, the Archetypes of J.U.S.T.I.C.E., fell in combat. The Great Society defended their world from all manner of threats, and eventually became aware of the Incursions.   In her latest book, “Great Society: A New History,” Shlaes shifts her focus forward by about a quarter-century, offering an account of the s centered on President Johnson’s campaign Author: Binyamin Appelbaum. The Great Society In the year , a massive Kree/Skrull invasion force descended upon the Earth in a bid to conquer it, Earth's Mightiest Heroes: The Archetypes of J.U.S.T.I.C.E. rose up against.

  “The Great Society created more.” In a follow-up to her The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression (), Shlaes writes that Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society reforms “seemed designed to finish the job” of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal government expansion and had similarly disastrous results. The s reforms—community action, housing, and other . What is your Great Society Comic Book, The comic book worth? Values of Great Society Comic Book, The | | Free Comic Book Price Guide This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. In Great Society, Shlaes offers a powerful companion to her legendary history of the s, The Forgotten Man, and shows that in fact there was scant difference between two presidents we consider opposites: Johnson and Nixon. Just as technocratic military planning by “the Best and the Brightest” made failure in Vietnam inevitable, so planning by a team of the domestic best and brightest . In Great Society, Shlaes offers a powerful companion to her legendary history of the s, The Forgotten Man, and shows that in fact there was scant difference between two presidents we consider opposites: Johnson and Nixon. Just as technocratic military planning by “the Best and the Brightest” made failure in Vietnam inevitable, so planning by a team of the domestic best and brightest Reviews:

The Great Society Comic Book (and its companion book Bobman and Teddy) are no more underground comic books than Mad was in the '60s, but their irreverent satire depicting world-reknown political figures as superheroes and villains holds great attraction to many underground comic fans and collectors. And, in fact, it's quite possible that the writer of these two books was inspired by early comic fanzines from . The Great Society Comic Book #[] () Parallax Publishing Company, Inc., Series Volume? Price USD Pages 36 Indicia Frequency? Indicia / Colophon Publisher Parallax Comic Books, Inc. Brand Parallax Editing Ann Weingarden (executive editor) Issue Notes. The Great Society #1 No recent wiki edits to this page. This comic is about Super LBJ, which stands for Lyndon B. Johnson, and his cabinet. They form a team which is called G.R.E.A.T. (Group. Great Society is a sequel, or perhaps simply a continuation, of the themes Shlaes introduces in The Forgotten Man. Both are titled “A New History” and some reviewers have described them as revisionist history. I view them as a new perspective on these periods in American history.4/5(62).