Jewish funeral
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Jewish funeral an illustrated analysis of the laws and customs governing the Jewish funeral by Shmuel Rubenstein

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Published by S. Rubenstein in Bronx, N.Y .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Funeral rites and ceremonies, Jewish

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 37.

Statementby Shmuel Rubenstein.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsBM712 .R84 1977
The Physical Object
Pagination37 p. :
Number of Pages37
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2878990M
LC Control Number84101350

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A Jewish funeral differs in many ways from a Christian funeral and that of other religions and cultures. As such, Jewish funeral etiquette also differs. For instance, there is no viewing. To honor the deceased, the casket remains closed, with friends and family prohibited from seeing the person who has passed. The Jewish funeral consists of a burial, also known as an interment. Cremation is forbidden. Burial is considered to allow the body to decompose naturally, therefore embalming is forbidden. Burial is intended to take place in as short an interval of time after death as possible. The Jewish Mourners Book of Why, Jonathan David Publishers.   Jewish funeral services can take place at the synagogue, funeral home or graveside at the cemetery. At the graveside of a Jewish funeral, it is a common tradition, along with a sign of respect and love to the deceased, for the mourners and friends to participate in the actual burial. Jewish tradition teaches that human beings are created in the image of God (Genesis ). This is the underpinning of all of the rituals and customs that make up a Jewish funeral. This concept extends both to the deceased and the mourners. Each community has their own customs in regard to funeral practices. Some customs are dictated by tradition.

There is no Jewish legal requirement that a divorced person must attend a former mate's funeral service, but it is certainly not prohibited. For one contemplating divorce, obligations for mourning depend on whether there was agreement to proceed with the divorce. # Jewish Guest Book For Funeral - 6 Ring Navy Blue with Silver Jewish Star The premium padded vinyl gives the look and feel of leather. Our in-house team of designers at Regal Line has more than a total of over 61 years of design experience. Each funeral guest design is heartfelt and sincere as well as beautiful and striking. SIGNATURE/CONDOLENCE LINES Our Butterfly Oval funeral guest.   Jewish law emphasizes that eulogies should be both truthful and praiseworthy. One should not lie about the qualities of the deceased or make obvious exaggerations, but it is proper to enhance their positive attributes (Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah ).Indeed, as commentaries on the Code of Jewish Law (such as the Bach and the Taz) have opined, it is better to slightly overestimate Author: Rabbi Jason Weiner. Dress appropriately. Proper attire for a funeral is a dress for women and a coat and tie for men. (It is generally customary for men to wear a head covering, called a kippah or yarmulke, during a funeral and some liberal congregations, this applies to both men and women; in others, head coverings are rare even for men.