Cover of: Cuban political economy | Read Online
Share

Cuban political economy controversies in Cubanology

  • 284 Want to read
  • ·
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Westview Press in Boulder .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Cuba

Subjects:

  • Cuba -- Economic conditions -- 1959-,
  • Cuba -- Economic policy,
  • Cuba -- Social policy

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographies and index.

Statementedited by Andrew Zimbalist.
SeriesSeries in political economy and economic development in Latin America
ContributionsZimbalist, Andrew S.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHC152.5 .C818 1988
The Physical Object
Paginationxiv, 240 p. ;
Number of Pages240
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2393381M
ISBN 100813374243
LC Control Number87022943

Download Cuban political economy

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

  This comprehensive and authoritative book assesses in theoretical and empirical terms some of the most widely debated issues in the study of Cuban political economy. It presents a broad critique of the mainstream scholarship in the United States on Cuban political : Cuba has had a socialist political system since based on the "one state – one party" is constitutionally defined as a Marxist–Leninist socialist state guided in part by the political ideas of Karl Marx, one of the fathers of historical materialism, Friedrich Engels and Vladimir e being regarded as a Communist state, the ideology of José Martí is what. Genre/Form: Aufsatzsammlung: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Cuban political economy. Boulder: Westview Press, (OCoLC) Material Type. Get this from a library! CUBAN POLITICAL ECONOMY: controversies in cubanology.. [Andrew S Zimbalist;] -- This comprehensive and authoritative book assesses in theoretical and empirical terms some of the most widely debated issues in the study of Cuban political economy. It presents a .

This comprehensive and authoritative book assesses in theoretical and empirical terms some of the most widely debated issues in the study of Cuban political economy. It presents a broad critique of the mainstream scholarship in the United States on Cuban political economy. The Cuban economy has been transformed over the course of the last decade, and these changes are now likely to accelerate. In this edited volume, prominent Cuban economists and sociologists present a clear analysis of Cuba's economic and social circumstances and suggest steps for Cuba to reactivate economic growth and improve the welfare of its citizens. The Cuban government has begun encouraging privately owned businesses, but it’s unclear how much this will change the Cuban economy, or how long this change in policy will last. Cuba’s centrally planned economy is controlled by the government, but that hasn’t deterred all foreign investment. Cuba has a dual currency system, whereby most wages and prices are set in Cuban pesos (CUP), while the tourist economy operates with Convertible pesos (CUC), set at par with the US dollar. Every Cuban household has a ration book (known as libreta) entitling it to a monthly supply of food and other staples, which are provided at nominal g code: +

Boulder, CO: First Forum Press, pp. By Archibald R. M. Ritter and Ted A. Henken. Review by Sergio Díaz-Briquets,. Cuban Studies, Vol , pp. , University of Pittsburgh Press. The small business sector, under many different guises, often has been, since the s, at the center of Cuban economic policy. The economic growth spurt of the s and early s, with Soviet funding, fostered social-development investments and consolidated bureaucratic socialist governance. The book was published at the end of revolutionary Cuba’s best fifteen years of economic growth. Horowitz, Irving Louis, and Jaime Suchlicki, eds. Cuban Communism. 9th. ed.   Cuba is now implementing a rationing program to combat its very own shortages of basic goods. A CBC report indicates this program would cover basic items such as chicken, eggs, rice, beans, and soap. When Fidel Castro took control of Cuba in .   The US campaign against the Cuban doctors has intensified amid recent political changes in Latin America, which have led to the expulsion of the missions from several countries, including Bolivia.